Volunteering

Volunteering — Blog Post #4

Volunteering, Niles Canyon Railway
Posted: August 13, 2015 at 4:00 am   /   by   /   comments (0)

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February 21, 2015

This time the MOW volunteers were faced with a brain teaser. Do burros have bridles? It turns out they do, when the burro in question is a Burro Crane. As part of the project to extend the railway to Pleasanton, there are many sections of panel track stacked at the end-of-track east of Verona. These panels will need to be lifted into place on the right-of-way and for this we need the Burro Crane.

We have two such cranes, one of which was brought to Brightside where the best parts will be removed and used to rebuild the second Burro. One of these parts is the bridle, which is two sets of large pulleys that raise and lower the boom. Our task was to remove as much of the body work as possible to make it easier to remove the very heavy bridle and other parts inside the crane body. We removed all manner of bolts and panels. The sliding door on the crane operator’s cab was a challenge that required the forklift, a long chain and some very descriptive language.

The door was removed without being damaged. We also wanted to remove the “Burro” sign from the side of the cab, but the fasteners had rusted in place. The grinder was brought into play and the sign was removed for use on the second crane. If you are interested in learning more about the Burro Crane, Google “Burro Crane History”.

Volunteering, Niles Canyon Railway

The Burro crane before we started work.

Volunteering, Niles Canyon Railway

The back of the Burro crane before we started work.

Volunteering, Niles Canyon Railway

MOW Selfie #1.

Volunteering, Niles Canyon Railway

MOW Selfie #2.

Volunteering, Niles Canyon Railway

Burro crane after a day of removing bodywork.

Volunteering, Niles Canyon Railway

Lots more daylight through the crane after we were done for the day.

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